Its also a matter of real estate inflation

money

which certainly varies from locale to locale. The house my parents bought when I was in 6th grade, a 1927-built 4-bedroom home in the Spanish style prevalent here in Southern California, cost them 82,500 then. I’m now 48 years old, and they just received an offer to sell it for 1.2 million. Soooooooo liability? I don’t think so (Smile.)

But in general, I think there’s a lot of good sense in Kski’s books, especially “The Cash Flow Quadrant” and you can learn a GREAT deal about money, about your attitudes towards it, and about business and how to read a balance sheet by playing his great educational board game called “CashFlow.” Anyone in the Southern California area who’d like to, let me know–I’ve got the game and we find it quite illuminating and it has NOTHING to do with MLM.

–Dan

One of the concepts Robert promotes is his cash-flow quadrant

finance money

Obviously, I can’t reproduce it here, but (hopefully quickly) I can try to describe it.

In the upper left is the letter “E” –
for employee.
Lower left is “S” – for
self-employed
Upper right is “B” – for business owner
Lower right
is “I” – for investor

He says that the two left quadrants are for the people who trade time for money and whose money doesn’t work for them if they stop working.

The right two quadrants are for the people who have an asset that works for them (depending upon how well they set it up), regardless of whether or not they are directly involved in day-to-day operations.

I like his basic premise here, but the problem is that he places IBOs, or distributors in an MLM, in the B quadrant – for business owners. And as all of us here have discovered, an IBO really owns nothing. It’s this mislabeling of participants in MLM as “business owners” that, for a man clearly as astute as he is, makes him a sell-out.

I have not read “Ordinary People, Extraordinary Wealth.” Sounds like it needs to be on my reading list. Thanks.